Iraq’s Year of Rage

Article
October 2016
Iraqis of all ethnic and sectarian stripes are fed up with the ineptitude and corruption of their political leaders, parties, and government institutions.

Iraq: A Vote Against Sectarianism

Article
July 2010

Although many Iraqi parties continue to be organized along religious or ethnic lines, both the tone and the results of the 2010 parliamentary election campaign show that most Iraqi voters prefer a broader national agenda over narrow sectarian appeals.

Lessons from Afghanistan and Iraq

Article
July 2010

After almost ten years of complex and costly efforts to build democracy in these two countries, where do things stand? What lay behind the critical choices that shaped events in these places, and what are their current prospects for success?

Books in Review: Inside Iraq's Confessional Politics

Article
January 2008

A review of The Occupation of Iraq: Winning the War, Losing the Peace by Ali A. Allawi.

Electoral Systems Today: Iraq's Year of Voting Dangerously

Article
April 2006

Iraq’s three elections in 2005 highlighted the role—but also the limits—of electoral-system design in managing potentially polarizing divisions.

Getting to Arab Democracy: Dealing with Communalism

Article
January 2006

Whether ethnic, sectarian, or some combination of the two, communalsim is one of the massive realities of Middle Eastern life and politics. It is usually seen as an obstacle to democracy, but need that always be the case?

Getting to Arab Democracy: What Do Iraqis Want?

Article
January 2006

There is a widespread desire for democracy among the Iraqi public, but when it comes to the roles of religion, ethnicity, and gender equality in Iraq's new democracy, attitudes are more varied.

The New Iraq: Democratic Institutions and Performance

Article
July 2005

Even after its successful elections, Iraq remains a divided society. Democracy did not create these divisions, but it could be the key to managing them.

The New Iraq: The Uses of Historical Memory

Article
July 2005

If Iraq is to become the free and self-governing country that an overwhelming majority of its citizens want it to be, a "useable past" made accessible by historical memory will be vital.

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