The 2016 U.S. Election: How Trump Lost and Won

Article
April 2017

Three factors help to explain the historically wide split between the electoral and popular vote counts: economic and political fundamentals, polarization among voters over identity issues, and the sharply divergent ways in which the candidates chose to address these issues.

The 2016 U.S. Election: Can Democracy Survive the Internet?

Article
April 2017

Traditional intermediary institutions such as parties and the legacy media are not what they once were, and they are not coming back. What are the implications of new social media and digital-campaign techniques?

The 2016 U.S. Election: The Populist Moment

Article
April 2017

Rising populism in the U.S. and beyond is calling into question the liberal-democratic bargain that has defined the postwar era. What led to Americans’ present revolt against elites, and what are its implications?

The 2016 U.S. Election

Article
April 2017

The 2016 U.S. Election: Fears and Facts About Electoral Integrity

Article
April 2017

In 2016, concerns about the administration of elections in the United States generated highly charged partisan debates. Are the worries justified?

The 2016 U.S. Election: The Nomination Game

Article
April 2017

Since the 1970s, the U.S. presidential-nomination system has become more democratic, making primary elections crucial, reducing the influence of political parties, and making it easier for outsiders to win.

Documents on Democracy

Article
January 2017

Book Review: Discovering the “State-Nation”

Article
April 2012

A review of Crafting State-Nations: India and Other Multinational Democracies by Alfred Stepan, Juan J. Linz, and Yogendra Yadav.

Democracy and Deep Divides

Article
April 2010

How do democracies deal with the deep divisions created by race, ethnicity, religion, and language? The cases of Canada, India, and the United States show that democratic institutions—notably, competitive elections and independent judiciaries—can bridge divides and build stability, but they must find a way to manage the tension between individual and group equality.

Still Bowling Alone? The Post-9/11 Split

Article
January 2010

The crisis of the 9/11 terrorist attacks has sparked a surge of increased civic engagement by young people in the United States, but there is also evidence of a growing divide along class lines.

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